Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

EVENTS & FUNDRAISERS

 

SUPPORT/FUNDS

 

DID YOU KNOW?

In 2020, it’s estimated among women in the U.S. there will be*:

  • 276,480 new cases of invasive breast cancer (This includes new cases of primary breast cancer, but not recurrences of original breast cancers.)
  • 48,530 new cases of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), a non-invasive breast cancer
  • 42,170 breast cancer deaths

In 2020, it’s estimated among men in the U.S. there will be*:

  • 2,620 new cases of invasive breast cancer (This includes new cases of primary breast cancers, but not recurrences of original breast cancers.)
  • 520 breast cancer deaths

*American Cancer Society. Cancer Facts and Figures 2020. Atlanta, GA: American Cancer Society, 2020.

 

What is breast cancer?

Breast cancer occurs when cells in the breast divide and grow without their normal control. Tumors in the breast tend to grow slowly. By the time a lump is large enough to feel, it may have been growing for as long as 10 years. Some tumors are aggressive and grow much faster.

Learn about breast anatomy.

Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) is a non-invasive breast cancer. With DCIS, the abnormal cells are contained in the milk ducts (canals that carry milk from the lobules to the nipple openings during breastfeeding). It’s called “in situ” (which means “in place”) because the cells have not left the milk ducts to invade nearby breast tissue. You may also hear the terms “pre-invasive” or “pre-cancerous” to describe DCIS. Although DCIS is non-invasive, without treatment, it can develop into invasive breast cancer.

Learn about DCIS and the risk of invasive breast cancer.

Learn about treatment for DCIS.

 

Warning Signs

The warning signs of breast cancer are not the same for all women.

The most common signs are:

  • A change in the look or feel of the breast OR
  • A change in the look or feel of the nipple OR
  • Nipple discharge

If you have any of the warning signs described, see a health care provider. If you don’t have a provider, one of the best ways to find a good one is to get a referral from a trusted family member or friend. If that’s not an option, call your health department, a clinic or a nearby hospital. If you have insurance, your insurance company may also have a list of providers in your area.

Learn more about finding a health care provider.

For more information, tools, resources, and to donate to help end breast cancer, click here visit the Susan G. Komen Foundation web site.

 

The following sponsors support Breast Cancer Awareness Month on V103.3:

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