NTSB begins investigation after plane crash near I-40 in West Nashville

NTSB begins investigation after plane crash near I-40 in West Nashville

The plane’s pilot had requested an emergency landing at John Tune Airport prior to the crash.

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (WSMV) – The Metro Nashville Police Department said five people died when a plane crashed on the side of Interstate 40 in West Nashville.

Just after 7:40 p.m. Monday night, the pilot of a single-engine plane reported that they were having engine and power failure issues. As a result, an emergency landing was set to take place at John C. Tune Airport, but before that could happen, the plane lost altitude and then plummeted into the shoulder area along I-40 near Charlotte Pike, right behind the Costco.

Leading up to the crash, Flight Aware showed that a Piper Saratoga with the tail number C-FBWH, which was registered out of Canada, departed from there and then made stops in Erie, Pennsylvania, followed by Mount Sterling, Kentucky, which is where it was coming from when the crash occurred.

The plane that crashed in Nashville was en route to John C. Tune Airport from Mount Sterling-Montgomery County Airport in Kentucky.

The plane that crashed in Nashville was en route to John C. Tune Airport from Mount Sterling-Montgomery County Airport in Kentucky.

Multiple agencies are investigating, including the Federal Aviation Administration and the National Transportation Safety Board, who will be looking into what happened and if this could have been prevented.

“This evening, at approximately 7:49 p.m., the Metropolitan Nashville Airport Authority (MNAA) was alerted of a single-engine aircraft crash three miles south of John C. Tune Airport, near I-40 at mile marker 203,” the Metropolitan Nashville Airport Authority said in a statement. “The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will investigate this aircraft accident after Metro first responders ensure the accident scene is safe.”

Officials said evidence from the scene was recovered to help with the investigation.

“That impact was catastrophic and did not leave any survivors. When our crews arrived on the scene, they were met with heavy flames and fire, smoke in the area from the crash site,” Nashville Fire Department spokesperson Kendra Loney said at a press conference Monday night. “They were able to extinguish that fire and also preserve the evidence from that scene so that the appropriate agencies can come and investigate what led to this deadly accident.”

The Tennessee Department of Transportation closed I-40 East immediately so emergency crews could access the crash site. Eastbound traffic was routed off at Exit 201/Charlotte Pike all night. The investigation and closure remain in place early Tuesday morning.

Nashville Mayor Freddie O’Connell praised Nashville’s first responders who were on the site quickly.

“Our thoughts go out to the loved ones of all those on board the single-engine aircraft that crashed near Interstate 40 this evening,” O’Connell said in a social media post on X. “I want to thank the Metro emergency responders who were on site quickly and extinguished the fire.”

There were no vehicles or buildings hit when the plane crashed on the side of the eastbound lanes of the interstate.

At this time, the names of ages of the people killed have not been released. Both the NTSB and FAA will be in Nashville on Tuesday to conduct their investigations.

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